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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Faculty of Health Sciences

Polonsky Commons at Ontario Tech University's north Oshawa location.

Another amazing year of research growth at Ontario Tech University

There’s further evidence of Ontario Tech’s impressive research growth this Spring after Canada’s research funding Tri-agencies announced a further $4.3 million in new grants for nearly 30 new multidisciplinary projects being led by the university’s experts.

Ontario Tech sign at the university's downtown Oshawa location.

Ontario Tech University to host Opioid Crisis Symposium on June 16

On Thursday, June 16, Ontario Tech’s Faculty of Social Science and Humanities will team with the Faculty of Health Sciences to host an Opioid Crisis Symposium. Professors and experts from a range of community organizations and service providers, including Lakeridge Health, the Region of Durham’s departments of Health and Social Services, the John Howard Society, and the Canadian Mental Health Association of Durham will each present their latest research and initiatives.

Ontario Tech on-campus Pi Day Pie Party at Shawenjigewining Hall: Hunter the Ridgeback with Amrutha Elanko, Vice-President Ontario Tech Student Union (centre) and Dr. Steven Murphy, President and Vice-Chancellor (March 14, 2022).

Let’s count the ways Ontario Tech’s annual Pi Day of Giving was a success!

Over the past month, Ontario Tech alumni, faculty, staff, students and members of our community came together for our students raising more than $156,000. Donors gave to scholarships, bursaries, athletics and in support of the Student Relief Fund, which provides assistance to students in many different ways.

Hour time and your time: Take a moment to plan for the change to Daylight Saving Time

For about a century, most Canadian communities have been adjusting clocks in the spring to take greater advantage of longer daylight hours afforded to the northern hemisphere in the warmer summer months. But with the time change comes a brief physiological adjustment, says Ontario Tech University sleep researcher Dr. Efrosini Papaconstantinou of the Faculty of Health Sciences.

Left: Ontario Tech University graduate Dr. Emily Bremer is now a faculty member at Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Right: Convocation 2014 at Ontario Tech with her Faculty of Health Sciences master's degree supervisor, Dr. Meghann Lloyd.

Double Ontario Tech grad now a Canada Research Chair at Acadia University

One of Ontario Tech University’s earliest students is now a member of a elite group of Canadian researchers. On January 12, Dr. Emily Bremer became one of the newest academics across the country to be appointed a Canada Research Chair (CRC), designated with the portfolio of Healthy Inclusive Communities.

Ontario Tech University researcher sets the record straight on vaccine facts and myths

While a small percentage of immunocompromised patients may not be eligible for the shots, vaccine hesitancy or refusal threatens to limit the overall effectiveness of vaccination programs. Competing opinions over the merits, and even safety of, vaccines continue to swirl in social media channels. Dr. Wally Bartfay of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Ontario Tech University looks to break down the facts in a myth-busting discussion.