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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

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Research

Example of drone swarm flying over an agricultural area in an unspecified location.

Ontario Tech researcher investigating the opportunities and risks associated with drone swarms

Institute for Cybersecurity and Resilient Systems networking and information technology expert Dr. Khalil El-Khatib of Ontario Tech’s Faculty of Business and Information Technology recently received new research funding from Canada’s National Cybersecurity Consortium (NCC) to investigate a ‘Trustworthy AI-based framework for self-aware drone-based swarm technologies’.

Ontario Tech students in the Dixon-Alger Fireside Reading Room in the Campus Library at the university's north Oshawa location.

Ontario Tech climbs again in annual Maclean’s university rankings

For one of Canada’s youngest research-intensive universities now celebrating its 20th anniversary, Ontario Tech University once again celebrates its remarkable trajectory in the 2024 Canadian post-secondary rankings published by Maclean’s magazine.

Ontario Tech University enjoys strong ties to University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE). In this image, Nuclear Engineering students speak with Sharman Perera, Associate Teaching Professor, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (right). UNENE has named Dr. Les Jacobs, Ontario Tech Vice-President of Research and Innovation (pictured below) to its Board of Directors.

Ontario Tech extends leadership role in nuclear engineering community

As Ontario Tech celebrates its 20th anniversary as an influential young Canadian research-intensive university, it contributes a fresh voice brimming with new ideas to help advance the energy industry into its next era, with a focus on net-zero carbon emission energy sources. Central to all of this activity is Ontario Tech’s longstanding role in the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE).

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Ontario Tech researcher exploring the next tech frontier for smart devices reappointed as Canada Research Chair

OSHAWA, ONTARIO – The rapid expansion of wearable, embedded and ‘smart’ devices with wireless connectivity (through protocols such as Wi-Fi or Bluetooth) continues to revolutionize the way we work and live. Billions of devices or ‘things’, from electronics to pacemakers to our home appliances, can be programmed to operate autonomously or connect and exchange data device-to-device, often with minimal human involvement.

James Lisondra participated in the Amgen Symposium at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Ontario Tech University celebrates first Amgen Scholar

James Lisondra can add an impressive accolade to his resume: First Ontario Tech University student to participate in the Amgen scholarship, a prestigious program run by Harvard University and hosted by the University of Toronto.