Skip to main content
COVID-19 information and screening Learn how we’re keeping our campus community safe, healthy and engaged during our gradual return to campus.
Note: Faculty, staff, students and visitors must complete the mandatory screening questionnaire before coming to campus.
Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Faculty of Business and Information Technology

Ontario Tech University 2021-2022 Founder's Scholarship recipient Hana Haytaoglu (Trenton, Ontario). Note: Available photos of other award recipients can be found below in the gallery section of the story.

2021-2022 Ontario Tech University major scholarship recipients

Each year, seven outstanding incoming students are awarded to Ontario Tech University’s most prestigious entrance scholarships. The university’s scholarship program recognizes secondary school students for exceptional achievements in academics, leadership and community involvement throughout their high school career.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques tries the Bio-Monitor, a new Canadian technology, for the first time in space. The innovative smart shirt system is designed to measure and record astronauts’ vital signs. (Credit: Canadian Space Agency/NASA).

Reaching for the stars: New Ontario Tech research on the health of astronauts in space

For more than 20 consecutive years, there’s been an uninterrupted human presence on the International Space Station (ISS). This year, the orbiting living lab will get an important new research boost from Canada’s space science community—research closely tied to Ontario Tech University computer science and health analytics expert Dr. Carolyn McGregor AM.

Ontario Tech entrepreneurial leaders and social innovators win national awards

A key component of experiential learning opportunities at Ontario Tech is the campus community group Enactus (derived from ‘Entrepreneurial, Action, Us’), which rallies the energy, ideas and passion of the best and brightest students to create and implement local empowerment projects and business ventures.

Code Jumper setup in the Faculty of Business and Information Technology Human Machine Laboratory at Ontario Tech University. Code Jumper retails for about C$1,300. Ontario Tech researchers are developing prototypes of new paper models for visually impaired youth to learn coding at home in an affordable way, with considerations of different paper textures (feel) and perfume (smell) for visually impaired students to bring back home after a summer coding camp at the university.

New technologies will expand coding camp accessibility for youth with vision loss

Ontario Tech University researchers Dr. Patrick Hung, Dr. Alvaro Quevedo, and Dr. Miguel Vargas Martin of the Faculty of Business and Information Technology (FBIT) explore ways to provide accessible technology such as haptic technology and Code Jumper for visually impaired youth to learn visual programming.

Virtual three-day event reveals that the future of autonomous tech is already here

The latest ideas on the autonomous front were explored March 2 to 4 at the Third Annual Future Transportation and Mobility Series Event. The virtual event drew close to 400 attendees spanning 25 different countries and featured leading experts on the progression and future of connected and autonomous technology (C/AV), revealing to a global audience that it is no longer simply an idea of the future.

Giulia Santin is a fourth-year student in the Game Development and Entrepreneurship specialization of Ontario Tech University’s Bachelor of Information Technology degree program.

At the top of her game: Ontario Tech student wins game-dev competition

On January 26, Giulia Santin learned she won first place in the Game Design Challenge in the first edition of the Womxn Develop at Ubisoft mentorship competition. The award includes a paid apprenticeship at the Ubisoft Toronto studio, to work on the company’s leading games and to learn from experienced teams as they start their careers in game development.

Ontario Tech University researchers at the forefront of cybersecurity trends

In the advent of artificial intelligence, cloud storage, social media and the Internet of Things, cybersecurity stakes have never been higher. And meeting that challenge is a major component of the research portfolio at Ontario Tech University, where dedicated experts are exploring the intersection of technical, legal, social, economic and ethical implications of privacy, security and trust technologies.

Dr. Carolyn McGregor, Professor, Faculty of Business and Information Technology (right) is the Inaugural Research Chair in Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Health and Wellness at Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences. With Tim Pauley, Director, Research and Academics, Ontario Shores (left) and Elaina Niciforos, Research and Academics co-op student, Ontario Shores (centre).

Remarkable COVID-19 observation: Fewer incidents of aggression in a mental health-care setting

A research partnership involving Ontario Shores and Ontario Tech University is documenting a reduction in aggressive incidents at the hospital during the pandemic, along with the decreased need to use restraints and seclusion to manage patient behaviour. These unexpected learnings could have significant impact on future approaches to mental health support and preventing aggression. The data suggests that health care should not necessarily return to ‘normal’ post-pandemic.